Saturday, May 31, 2014

Insomnia: Book Release Reading And Signing




The public is invited to meet the author at a Book Release event featuring Edward Vidaurre, presenting his new collection of poetry, INSOMNIA (El Zarape Press), at 7:30 to 9 p.m. on June 6 at Cordoba Cafe (1303 N. 10th St, McAllen). Books will be available for $8.

In his second collection of poetry, Edward Vidaurre offers new poems focusing on--and inspired by--bouts of insomnia, and the vivid dream-like imagery that a lack of sleep creates. With an introduction by award-winning Katherine Hoerth. Pick up this book on those weird and wonderful nights when it’s 2:07 a.m. and the waning echoes of yesterday’s shattered dreams and sprightly nightmares reverberate madly against the thickly transparent rays of the moon. In this collection of poems, Edward Vidaurre captures the lingering accusations and celebrations of the night that mingle with the fresh affirmations of the morning through poems filled at times with umbrage and desperation and at others with the sort of devilish charm that has come to define his candid wit. Like a bad dream that won’t go away or a good dream that just makes one’s day Vidaurre’s new collection, Insomnia, rouses us with a twitch and spilt coffee jerk and lulls us with knowing nods to those moments of clarity and opaqueness, of sweetness and acrimony, of haunting realism that can’t help but keep us awake for just one more poem.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Conceived in El Salvador and born in Los Angeles, California, in 1973, Edward Vidaurre, has been published in several anthologies and literary journals, among them: La Bloga, Bordersenses, Interstice, La Noria Literary Journal, Left Hand of the Father, Brooklyn & Boyle, and Boundless—the Anthology of the Valley International Poetry Festival 2011, 2012, & 2013. His book I Took My Barrio On A Road Trip (Slough Press) was published in 2013.

Vidaurre co-edited TWENTY: Poems in Memoriam, an anthology in response to the Newtown, CT, tragedy, and Boundless 2014: the Anthology of the Rio Grande Valley International Poetry Festival.

His work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. He resides in Edinburg, Texas, with his wife and daughter.

He hasn’t slept well in years.

Insomnia, El Zarape Press, 2014
http://www.amazon.com/Insomnia-Edward-Vidaurre/dp/1499525796

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Poetry Hurts Today

To those of you close to me, you've heard the story time and time again about my stubbornness as a high school kid who didn't read his first book (in its entirety) until the last semester before graduating. At the time my English teacher was teaching Shakespeare. I sat in the back of the class, making these snide remarks taking everyone's attention away from the lesson. The teacher pulled me to the side and and demanded an explanation for the disruption. From what I remember, I said something like:

Who talks like that? We will never need to know anything about this Shakespeare vato. I can't relate!

She then said, "Tomorrow I will have a book for you that you'll enjoy" I doubted it. But in a way looked forward to it. I walked to class the following day, Macbeth on the VCR player and me with a "me vale" attitude about it. Before class ended she walked up to me and handed me:


Claude Brown became my instant hero. Poverty, violence, offensive language, drugs....I was hooked. Brown opened the door to literature in my soul. after Manchild I would welcome Richard Wright into my world...Black Boy, Native Son and Rite of Passage. I always had to read pages over and over again until I got it, eventually I did and followed suit by reading the classics - until I hit a wall with James Joyce's Ulysses. By this time nothing could deter me from loving to read. Although I could relate to the poverty, drugs, etc..there was something missing....Mi gente!

Two years later I came across Luis J. Rodriguez' "Always Running"-based on his life as a gang member in East Los Angeles. Now I can really relate. 

Along the way I picked up some Octavio Paz, Carlos Castañeda, Miguel de Cervantes, Neruda, Victor Villaseñor and Lorca. 

I dabbled in writing, mostly letters to girls and personal journal writings. I found that Luis J. Rodriguez and Richard Wright also wrote poetry.....WHAT? 

Many years would pass and my love for literature would have its break ups and make ups 
until around 2004 or so...Even though I knew Luis was alive I thought all the poets were dead. I mean literally, poetry was not something people did. Well they did, and still do. I have been blessed to meet so many wordsmiths that have inspired me and my writings along with muses and those long gone. 

I read poetry.
I try to read lots of it.
I never really indulged in the words of Maya. But I damn well knew her importance and poetic sainthood in this world. I found "phenomenal woman" at a book store and brought it home not too long ago and thought, "that's beautiful."

Today I've read testimonies of those that met her and knowing I never will, sucks. 

Poetry hurts today.

Rest in Peace Maya Angelou
April 4, 1928 - May 28, 2014







Thursday, May 15, 2014

El Zarape Press presents Insomnia, a collection of new poetry by Edward Vidaurre.


In his second collection of poetry, Edward Vidaurre offers new poems focusing on--and inspired by--bouts of insomnia, and the vivid dream-like imagery that a lack of sleep creates. With an introduction by award-winning Katherine Hoerth.

"Pick up this book on those weird and wonderful nights when it’s 2:07 a.m. and the waning echoes of yesterday’s shattered dreams and sprightly nightmares reverberate madly against the thickly transparent rays of the moon. In this collection of poems, Edward Vidaurre captures the lingering accusations and celebrations of the night that mingle with the fresh affirmations of the morning through poems filled at times with umbrage and desperation and at others with the sort of devilish charm that has come to define his candid wit. Like a bad dream that won’t go away or a good dream that just makes one’s day Vidaurre’s new collection, Insomnia, rouses us with a twitch and spilt coffee jerk and lulls us with knowing nods to those moments of clarity and opaqueness, of sweetness and acrimony, of haunting realism that can’t help but keep us awake for just one more poem."
Daniel García Ordaz, author of You Know What I’m Sayin’?

Available now through Amazon.com

Book Review: Sueño by Lorna Dee Cervantes

Review: Sueño
Author: Lorna Dee Cervantes
pages: 132 pages

Spending some time with Lorna Dee Cervantes in my truck. She's tossing pecan shells out the window as I turn the pages of her dreams. It's 65 degrees with a wind that blows through our conversation as she braids her hair showing me her heart-shaped scars that tell of wet feet and a milk that does not lie.

I can carry this great Chicana with me wherever I go. Opening up the pages to Sueño, her fifth major collection of poems-I savored each poem and read each one over again. In "Fear of Death" I found myself gasping for Marta, "Martha had a fear of death, she wouldn't sleep for the child still caught in her throat..." Sueño does that! The words jumped out at me and gave me fortaleza as a poet, just as Langston Hughes and Juan Felipe Herrera have.

Lorna held nothing back. She peeled the skin off of mother earth inside out, wrote about it, stitched it back together and still has enough poetic prowess to continue the mastery of language. Brain food made with tortillas de maíz, the slap I felt in Language from her grandmother and her true Leo self shells out a powerful poem with Hips Hitting The Floor.

The ode to her love in Intergrity shows her wisdom and heart as a poet and lover, "I love the way we fit together as if I were your seed." There was never a time after reading this book, whether in spurts or long coffee shop visits, that I did not put it down and smile. Cervantes weaves the Native back into us with her selflessness, wisdom and energy.

Learn how good sleep sounds, Dulces Sueños!


-Edward Vidaurre

*Published on La Tolteca Zine Spring 2014 issue

La Tolteca ‘Zine, Spring Solstice 2014 ¡Sí se puede!

A literary arts magazine that promotes the advancement of a world without borders and censorship. Theme: The Politics of Water. Sonnet Contest Winners, and Workshopistas’ Palette.